Adobe Will Support Flash Player on Linux Once Again

Adobe just announced that it plans to begin supporting Adobe Flash for Linux 4 years after it abandoned.

In 2012 the company said it would not make newer versions of its then NPAPI Flash player plugin which was available on Linux, but would only provide security updates for Flash Player 11.2 until 2017.

But, a small announcement was made on its blog last week about having a u-turn on both decisions and even provided a beta build of Adobe Flash 23 for Linux.

adobe-flash-linux

That’s right!  Adobe announced that it going to resume support for the NPAPI Flash Player plugin on Linux and that’s not all. It would also continue providing security updates past 2017, writing,

“in the past, we communicated that NPAPI Linux releases would stop in 2017. This is no longer the case”.

A new beta of the NPAPI plugin was made available to download and while it will work just fine work in Mozilla Firefox and other apps but not apps that have deprecated or removed NPAPI plugins, e.g. Google Chrome.

Why has Adobe done this?

According to Adobe it is

“… moving [the NPAPI Linux Flash player plugin] forward and in sync with the modern release branch” to “improve security and provide additional mitigation to the Linux community.”

They go on to say that this change is “…primarily a security initiative” and that the “new NPAPI build represents a significant step forward in functionality, stability, and security.”

The Thing Is:

If you use Google Chrome then you already use a new flash on Linux.

Google ships Google Chrome with a PPAPI plugin which Linux users have been able to use to make an up-to-date version of Flash. Google maintains this PPAPI plugin and  it ships as part of Chrome OS too.

Most Linux distros offer a “helper” package that extracts the PPAPI Flash plugin from Chrome after downloading it and makes it available for other applications to use.

Where to Download

You can download binaries of the NPAPI Adobe Flash player beta from the Adobe Labs website. And for more on Adobe’s change of heart check out this post on the official Adobe Flash Player blog.

About The Author
Okoi Martins Jr.
I'm a Computer Scientist with a passion for learning new things in fields ranging from theoretical implications of computer science and mathematical modeling to web development and music. In my spare time, I listen to music, read like a compiler, and learn like an A.I algorithm.

Leave a Response