Download The New GNOME 3.22 And MATE 1.16 Now

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After 6 months of development, the new GNOME 3.22 comes complete with a total of 22980 changes thanks to the contribution of about 775 participators.

The GNOME team plans to make this version available for Fedora Workstation 25 as the desktop environment, with its major highlight coming in the form of Flatpak integration – a framework with the aim of helping app developers package and share their software across various distros more easily.

GNOME 3.22 also comes with a revamped app store. The renovated landing page now displays more applications and the category section makes for an easier navigation. There’s also a change to the color-coded badges.

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Nautilus (the files application) can now batch rename files and perform better sorting and view controls. GNOME also received improvements to its Keyboard Settings, dconf Editor, Calendar, Polari, Videos, and Boxes, among other apps.

Check out the GNOME 3.22 Release Notes for a detailed list  of changes

MATE 1.16

MATE 1.16, just like its counterpart, has arrived after 6 months of continous development, with this release focusing on bug fixes, improvements in GTK3+ compatibility and migrating components to newer libraries. The GTK3+ support has therefore been improved across the entire MATE Desktop.

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Application and theme support for GTK+ 3.22 is one of the major changes that have come in MATE 1.16. More applications are built against GTK3+ only, including apps like MATE Notification Daemon, MATE Session Manager, MATE Polkit, Engrampa, and MATE Terminal.

The development team has worked to decouple some applications from libmate-dekstop and port some to GApplcation. You can read the complete MATE 1.16 Changelog for a detailed list of changes

About The Author
Okoi Martins Jr.
I'm a Computer Scientist with a passion for learning new things in fields ranging from theoretical implications of computer science and mathematical modeling to web development and music. In my spare time, I listen to music, read like a compiler, and learn like an A.I algorithm.

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