Budgie Desktop Now Has Support for Indicator Applets

budgie-app-indicator-support

 

The awesome GNOME-based Budgie desktop environment just has gained the long needed support for indicator applets as well-known software like Clementine and Dropbox make use of indicator applets to allow for tray-based access to various system features, options, and information.

There are a good number of indicator-only third-party utilities out there, it is always more convenient to have Budgie desktop handling such app indicators. This new fix is now available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 Budgie desktop users.

According to Budgie Remix’s developers, the new app indicator applet should be used on its own in place of the regular system-tray applet, so users are advised not to run both side-by-side.

It’s also important to keep in mind that this is an early release, and that some advanced settings or enhancements may be missing.

Remember that this fix is just newly available and so some features might not be included yet, but there sure is a plan to include the option to change indicator order and support in order to enable the applet to work alongside the standard system-tray applet in the near future.

Installing & adding the applet

You will need to add the  official Budgie Remix PPA to your Software Sources in order to install this new applet since it is not available with the version of Budgie that’s available from the Ubuntu archives in Yakkety.

So, open a new Terminal and run the following command to first update your software sources to make it aware of the newly available applet and then enter the command below to install it:

sudo apt update && sudo apt install budgie-indicator-applet

Done entering the command? Now add the applet by opening the Raven sidebar and entering the applet editor and then choosing its position on the panel. Don’t forget to remove the System Tray applet.

About The Author
Okoi Martins Jr.
I'm a Computer Scientist with a passion for learning new things in fields ranging from theoretical implications of computer science and mathematical modeling to web development and music. In my spare time, I listen to music, read like a compiler, and learn like an A.I algorithm.

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